Day 47: Rintoul Hut to Starveall Hut

Cloudy. It was cloudy this morning. But we had to move, there was no choice. I could have stayed for another day, but I wasn’t very interested in that.

So we left. Immediately past the hut the climb began. And climb we did. And climb. And finally popped out above the tree line onto the scree slope we’d be climbing for a bit more. Eventually we got past the cloud the hut was in and got our first taste of the view.

Sadly, the top of the mountain was also shrouded in cloud. But in a way that was almost better. It felt like we were on another planet. The rocky ground, sparse plant life, bright, diffuse sunlight, and zero visibility. Was quite nice.

At last we reached the very top. It was pretty awesome. The cloud made it feel like we were above the entire planet. They started down the hill, I stuck around a bit to have a moment.

I don’t remember all I thought about but I was both incredibly happy and incredibly sad I was up there, on top of the last major peak before the finish. Especially after now 6 days on this section I’m rather looking forward to getting back to civilization, but at the same time I wanted to hold onto that happy feeling of achievement for so much longer.

I was also thinking how awesome it was that I was here with the first 2 northbounders I met, after all this time. The last several days with them has been amazing and fun and sharing that summit with them was a highlight of the trip.

I also thought more about what’s next. I still don’t entirely know that. I feel like I want to find a job and go back to work, but I also want to make certain there’s ample room for adventures like this one. No way am I going to be content with sitting behind a keyboard for 40 hours a week for the rest of my life.

I did cry, for the record. Not like I cried when I reached the summit of Bear Camp on Cycle Oregon last year, but I still cried. It was a beautiful moment, and despite not having a view, I feel like it couldn’t have been more perfect.

Afterward, we started what must have been the most technically difficult section of the trail yet. Mount Rintoul has a sister summit, Little Rintoul, and the path between them is incredibly challenging. A while back I’d told my friend Faith, someone who has done her fair share of long hikes and travel, that I didn’t know if I wanted to keep going. She said “it’s just walking”. That was the running joke for the day.

Today was a beast. And then we finally got past the Rintouls and back into merely moderately difficult terrain.

Originally my plan had been to just go from Rintoul hut to Old Man Hut, only one hut down the trail. This was before when I thought I’d spend more time at the summit, when I assumed it would take far longer to cross than it did, and before I’d spent the entire previous day lying in my bed in a hut doing bugger all. So today we pushed on to Slaty Hut. But we got there around 3:15, and the next hut was supposed to only be 3 hours away. So we ate, and moved on. The idea being that if we did this bit faster and had a long day on the tail, we could do the rest of this in 3 days instead of 4. Not only meaning their food supplies would be less stretched, but that we’d get to burgers that much faster. Seriously, all we can think about is burgers. That’s it. Burgers. Give me a burger and a pile of chips.

We finally got out of the clouds to some nice views again.

And then we arrived at Starveall Hut. To find it overflowing with people. And not really any good options around for camping. John and Christine found a spot in the woods, and I pitched up on the helipad, figuring I’d hear a helicopter coming in for a landing in enough time to get out of the way. But one of the people inside ended up sleeping outside, and I thought there would already be people on the floor, but nope, nobody, so I packed up my tent and moved inside. I’m glad I did. It’s windy and cold outside. Inside we have a fire going. Much better.

Tomorrow we head for Rocks Hut, which I’ve heard good things about. If nothing else, there are flush toilets. After several huts with wasp nests in the loo it’ll be a nice change of pace. According to notes it’ll be 8.5 hours tomorrow, but the next 2 huts are only 2 and 2 past that, so we may push on to shorten our last day on this section a bit. The last day is about 70% walking down a gravel road, with little chance of a hitch, but it’s zombie walkable so it’s fine if it’s a long day. Plus: burgers.

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